Lytham 01253 734791
Preston 01772 822591

Eye Examinations

Your eye exam is a fully comprehensive vision assessment but also a very relevant health check.

It is important to have regular eye exams even if you don’t feel you are having any problems.

A full sight test includes:

  • Discussion of any visual problems you are having and information taken regarding your ocular history.
  • Measuring your vision at distance and near and determining if any prescription is required. We also monitor accommodation (how well you can focus your eyes).
  • Checking your eye muscles are working well together.
  • A full health check assessing the eyes externally and internally. This may include measuring the pressure in your eyes.
  • Assessment of your field of vision (how well you see centrally and in the periphery).
  • Retinal photography is available at our Preston practice (additional fee applies).

Regular eye exams can lead to early detection and treatment of common eye problems such as cataracts, glaucoma and age related macula degeneration. Assessment of your eye health can also help to detect conditions which affect the whole body.

At Broadhursts our eye examinations are a minimum of 30 minutes and are tailored to meet your individual needs.

At the end of your eye exam the Optometrist will fully discuss the results with you. They will conclude any options for vision correction if it is required and give advice on maintaining eye health.

Our Preston practice also offers retinal examinations including the state-of-the-art Optomap retinal examination and digital fundus photography.

NHS eye examinations:

All of our practices offer NHS examinations

Are you entitled to an NHS eye examination?

The following people automatically qualify for free eye examinations at certain intervals as determined by the NHS and your optometrist:

  • If you are under 16.
  • If you are 16, 17 or 18 and in full-time education.
  • If you are aged 60 or over.
  • If you have glaucoma.
  • If you are advised by a hospital eye specialist (an ophthalmologist) that you are at risk of glaucoma.
  • If you are aged 40 or over and have a close relative (parent, brother, sister, son, or daughter) with glaucoma.
  • If you have diabetes.
  • If you are registered as severely sight-impaired/blind or sight-impaired/partially sighted.
  • If you have been prescribed complex lenses (the optometrist will need to see your last optical prescription).
  • If you are under a hospital eye service and your eye test is carried out through the hospital eye department as part of the management of your eye condition.

If you (or your partner) gets one of the following:

  • Income Support.
  • Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance.
  • Income-related Employment and Support Allowance.
  • Pension Credit Guarantee Credit.
  • You are entitled to, or named on, a valid NHS tax credit exemption certificate.
  • You are a war pensioner – if treatment is connected with the pensionable disability.
  • You are named on an HC2 (or HC3) certificate because of low income (see below).

Who gets help towards the costs of glasses and contact lenses?

You can get vouchers towards the costs of glasses or contact lenses:

  • If you are under 16.
  • If you are 16, 17 or 18 and in full-time education.
  • If you have been prescribed complex lenses (the optometrist will need to see your last optical prescription).

If you (or your partner) gets one of the following:

  • Income Support.
  • Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance.
  • Income-related Employment and Support Allowance.
  • Pension Credit Guarantee Credit.
  • You are entitled to, or named on, a valid NHS tax credit exemption certificate.
  • You are named on an HC2 (or HC3) certificate because of low income.

Want to book an examination? Click here to fill out the eye examination request form.

Can we help? Ask Mike

If you have a question, why not ask Mike Broadhurst? he would love to help.